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A Little About Central Michigan District Health Department

The Central Michigan District Health Department serves, Arenac, Clare, Gladwin, Isabella, Osceola, and Roscommon counties with a combined population of over 191,000 residents.  There are 92 townships and approximately 3,220 square miles within the District's jurisdiction.

Each of the six member counties appoints two County Commissioners as members of the twelve person District Board of Health to govern the agency's programming, finances, and personnel.  It is the responsibility of the Board of Health to see that a plan is designed and implemented which will provide long range, continuing protection for the residents of this Health District.

The history of the Central Michigan District Health Department dates back to 1935.  In February, 1935, Arenac, Clare, and Gladwin counties organized Health District Seven, also known as the Tri-County Health Department, and in 1966, Health Department Seven became associated with the Roscommon County Health Department and the Central Michigan District Health Department, which consisted of the three counties--Isabella, Osceola, and Mecosta.  In 1970, this associated district became one district known as the Central Michigan District Health Department, with the exception of Mecosta County.  The six counties that currently comprise the CMDHD are Arenac, Clare, Gladwin, Isabella, Osceola, and Roscommon.   Since August, 1989, Central Michigan District Health Department and Mid-Michigan District Health Department (Gratiot, Clinton, and Montcalm counties) have been associated districts.  The association allows for each agency to retain its individual Boards of Health budgets and services.

Presently, a single set of program listings, program plans, and policies are consolidated into a single Operational Plan for the entire Health Department.  In this way, services are standardized throughout the District; a single, less expensive management and supervisory group is required; and staff recruitment, training, and utilization are conducted more efficiently.

The Health Department is financed through appropriations from the member counties, with additional funds being collected through federal and state resources, and local fees.